Interviews

“I loved the trend of reading good books and then sharing them with our social circle” – Faiza Kayani

“We are a nation blessed with many talented people but aspiring writers do not know how to have their work published. I want to help such writers so that their talent will not die,” says Faiza Kayani as she discusses her life and activities in this exclusive interview with MOIWrites.

1. Tell us about yourself?

I am Faiza Kayani. A software engineer by educational qualification and part of Civil Armed Forces. I belong from Tehsil Sohawa of District Jhelum to a family with an army background. I have remained a bilingual debater for nearly 8 years, won different prizes and trophies for my institutes. I was President of COMSATS Literary Society and worked with different societies as a volunteer for the betterment of society.

2. What inspires you to write? 

I started writing when I was in grade 6. At that time my father was posted in Gilgit and I was studying at Army public School, Gilgit. My father is a book lover. And we have a vast collection of books at home, most of them comprising Urdu Literature. I am basically a keen observer and notice daily life routine of people around me and the changing trends in society, both positive and negative, social issues around the globe particularly in Pakistan. I convert my routine observations in verses and normally write about the common issues of society.

3. Tell us about your book “Mohabbat gustaakh hoti hai”?

“Mohabbat Gustakh Hoti Hai” is my very first published book. Its genre is poetry. It’s not only poetry actually. It’s me and what is happening around me. It reflects the common things happening around us. Readers will be able to relate themselves with the poems.
4. What challenges did you face when writing this book? Team Daastan has played a vital role in this regard. Especially Syed Ommer Amer remained supportive and encouraging. The only hurdle was the lack of time. It sometimes became difficult for me to follow up in time due to workload.

5. Which authors from Pakistan and from abroad do you enjoy reading? 

Bano Qudsia is my all time favorite. May Allah bless her soul with peace. And specifically speaking about poetry, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Saghar Siddiqi and Parveen Shakir are my favorite. Juan Eliya also has a status because of his poetry.

6. Where do you see yourself five years down the road? 

Hopefully, an author with many books published in my name and I am planning to write “nasar” as well. I actually want to work for the betterment of Urdu literature and book reading. As due to advancement in technology and availability of E-books, the trend of having books in hard form is vanishing from our society. I loved the trend of reading good books and then sharing them with our social circle. That trend has faded away and I intend at reviving this trend. I want to work in collaboration with team Daastan which is already doing their job in a great manner. We are a nation blessed with many talented people but aspiring writers do not know how to have their work published. I want to help such writers so that their talent will not die.

7. What advice will you give to aspiring writers? 

Continue doing your work. You yourself are the best critic and analyst of your work. Keep on reviewing your writings periodically. It will help you in maturing your work. The more you will write the more your skills will be polished and never ever get disappointed by criticism. It will always help you in grooming.

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Opinion

Taimur Rehman: A Urdu storyteller par excellence

You cannot explain elegance in mere words. You have to feel its essence. Taimur Rehman is a storyteller par excellence, a shining star in today’s haphazard world, who comprehends the essence of elegance of Urdu language and literature. He is an asset of Pakistan struggling to preserve, protect and promote Urdu language.

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His fluency in communicating verbally in the Urdu language makes him the gladiator we all need in today’s age when Pakistan’s youth is distancing itself from Urdu. Calm and composed in character and eloquent in expressing his thoughts, Taimur is on a mission – to bring back to life the essence and spirit of Urdu. His initiative on social media, QASID, is a courageous endeavor as he steps into the realm of Urdu literature and makes viewers of his videos experience the lost style, taste, class and sophistication that have always been the characteristics of the Urdu language. Perhaps Urdu was never lost, it was we, the masses, who went on following the Western languages and buried the beauty of Urdu somewhere in our subconscious.

Taimur’s vision to hold Urdu narrative sessions at Kuch Khass in 2011 in Islamabad propelled him at the right direction. He has performed at various national literature festivals across Pakistan and appeared at the South Asian Literature Festival in London. Moreover, he graced the TED forums thrice. Currently, he is working on a coffee table book comprising Pakistani and Indian poets.

Taimur’s love for Urdu echoes with vigor and enthusiasm through his videos. He can read prose, recite poetry and sing Urdu ghazals with his soft voice to send you back in the 70s, 80s or 90s when Urdu constituted a major part of our life. I have been playing his videos on repeat and it is mesmerizing to experience Urdu once again. Taimur’s Facebook bio fittingly says his heart’s feeling: “Technology mera paisha hai aur Urdu adab mera nasha!” (Technology is my passion and Urdu literature my addiction).