Interviews

“I just wish to study at different universities around the world until I hit forty or fifty. A guy can dream, can’t he?” – Naveed Sheharyar Khan

Naveed Sheharyar Khan, winner of Daastan’s 3rd Season of “The Stories Untold” talks to MOIWrites in this exclusive interview.

1. Tell us about yourself?

I am studying Accounting and Finance at a leading business school of Karachi. However, unlike a majority of peers, I enjoy reading, writing and poetry more than the matters of compound interest and time value of money. They say that we all have a purpose to fulfill in this world. If that is the truth, then my life purpose has to do something with writing!

2. Since when are you writing?

I started writing almost three years ago when a friend of mine, literally, coerced me to write my first article. The article was not as good, obviously, but I craved more of the euphoria that followed.

3. How was it to be the winner of the Stories Untold Season 3 by Daastan?

It was surprising, to be honest. Several of the contestants were much more accomplished writers than I could ever hope to be, which is why I did not have much expectation to win it. I am proud of what I have achieved.

4. What was the name of your winning story and what was it about? 

The title of my short story was “True Justice”. The plot involved a young Threader, who was seeking justice (read: revenge) for the extinction of his race. The story is centered on the difference between justice and revenge, and how love makes its way into the equation.

5. Do you plan before you write or do you write by following the concept of “going with the flow”?

Stephen King has always been an advocate of going with flow. Considering the things that he has accomplished, it is only natural for lowly mortals like me to follow his advice, no?

6. Do you think writing is a skill that one learns or is an in born talent? 

I honestly do not know. All I know is that I had to spend long nights learning the rules of grammar before I could ever hope to improve even an aspect of my works. Talent might have a role, but I do not think we can get anywhere without a good work ethic, sleepless nights and disrupted daily routines.

7. If you were to give aspiring writers five writing tips, what will they be?

Honestly, I am an aspiring write myself, and I do not see myself fitting to instruct others in the art I know very little of. However, if there is one thing that I have learned, it is that you need to let your imagination run wild.

8. Who are the authors from Pakistan and from abroad are among your favorite? 

Saadat Hassan Manto, definitely! He might have written in Urdu, but there is no writer who has had a deeper impact on me than Manto. Other than that, I love how Elif Shafak sees the world and writes about it. And who could forget J.D. Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye”?

9. What are your plans?

I hope I knew, honestly. For now, I just wish to study at different universities around the world until I hit forty or fifty. A guy can dream, can’t he?

10. Your message for the youth of Pakistan?

I mean, a twenty-one-year-old advising the youth of a country would seem pretty bizarre, right? However, if you were to ask me one thing that I have learned from my twenty-one-years on Mother Earth, I would say that it could be: “Only a handful of people are going to, truly, believe in us in our entire lifetimes. We need to hold them close; but most importantly, we need to believe in ourselves, regardless of everything. No one will do it for us!”

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Interviews

“Don’t let your fate decide your destination”: Lareb Soomro

Lareb Soomro is Sindh’s youngest novelist. She is a student of matriculation (tenth standard) aspiring to qualify for Chartered Accountancy and to earn a Nobel Prize in the field of Literature. She talks to MOIWrites in this exclusive interview

Lareb Soomro lives in Larkana and studies at the Indus Girls College, Larkano. She says, “I am ambitious in whatever I do and love to read, write and deliver motivational speeches. I have earned many accolades in debates, writing, hosting and singing competitions. When I was in seventh grade, I had a dream to show my abilities to the whole world. At the age of fourteen, I started writing when I gradually began knowing myself. That is my life’s greatest achievement yet. My great supporters are my parents. I do not have that much experience but some of my words inspire me and one such sentence is: “Don’t let your fate decide your destination.” Contact Lareb at: Lareb Writes

 

 1. How does it feel to be the youngest novelist of Sindh?

I want to thank Daastan for giving me the platform to display my skills. At an age when people are not aware of their abilities, I am blessed to have found a purpose of life and the title of Sindh’s youngest novelist.

2. What is the name of your novel? Share a brief synopsis of it?

The name of my novel is “The Secrets of Spring.” It is a horror and suspense novel, which is based on a girl named Spring. It is a magical story and the horror part does not include ghosts. You need to read the novel to find the reality. The story will take you to the world of broken mirrors where you will find it difficult to find the path back home. It has six episodes with each episode ending on a question. The biggest secret of the novel is about a Diary, which is always with Spring, but no one knows what is in it.

3. How did you develop an interest in writing?

Since my childhood, I had been hearing ‘do not become a writer’ because one cannot lead a comfortable life in this field. I decided to modify their thoughts. I began reading Daily Dawn’s Young World and started writing my poems, articles, and poetry in English. I continued my writings and then decided to create a page on Facebook where I can share my words. My passion to write led me to write a novel.

4. Which novels did you enjoy reading?

There would be a huge list of novels so it is better to share my thoughts about one novel. My favorite novel is “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho for it gives a great lesson to believe in your dreams, to learn from the nature of the universe, and to think about things in a different way.

5. What motivates you to write?

A spark of inspiration from my soul is enough to motivate me. I observe the world and I find the inspiration. My mind is free to wonder—to focus nothing else but silence and the words and ideas stumbling, swirling and dancing in my mind. Most of the times I just need a word or a phrase to think about as it deepness and later I use it in my writing.

6. What are your academic and writing plans?

I will complete courses in literature and want to achieve the highest level of studies in this field. Moreover, after matriculation, I will work to gain admission in CA. I will continue writing to console the depressed souls, to inspire the wondered minds, to encourage the hard workers and to eliminate the roots of negativity.

7. What message will you give to aspiring writers?

Rule your thoughts or they will rule you. Always try to understand the power of words because words have the power to make, shake and destroy the world. Always replace your negative thoughts with positive ones and believe in yourself. Be confident about what you think and spread the sparkles of light with your words in the blank pages of the world.

Sajal Shaikh has co-written “The Secrets of Spring” with Lareb Soomro. Sajal’s interview will be featured at MOIWrites next month.

Writing it Right

The beginning, middle, and end! – A short introduction

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Image Source: http://images2.fanpop.com/images/answers/9000/9292_1240256843151_450_300.jpg

Any short story, novella or novel must have a beginning, middle and an end. A beginning is a part where the author introduces the story to the readers. It is in this part where the characters are revealed, the setting and plot becomes evident and the theme is established. During the middle part of the story, the characters develop, entwine in the life of other characters and their own subplots emerge. During the middle, the author puts in the rising action and the conflict. This conflict creates tension in the plot as the protagonist and the antagonist and other supporting characters begin to evolve further. Also in the middle is the plot twist, which can bewilder the reader. By the end of the middle part, the conflict becomes thin and the protagonist resolves the conflict. The end of the story/novel shows how the conflict ends or in some cases, how another conflict begins that predicts the arrival of a sequel to the short story/novella/novel.

During the middle part of the story, the characters develop, entwine in the life of other characters and their own subplots emerge. During the middle, the author puts in the rising action and the conflict. This conflict creates tension in the plot as the protagonist and the antagonist and other supporting characters begin to evolve further. Also in the middle is the plot twist, which can bewilder the reader. By the end of the middle part, the conflict becomes thin and the protagonist resolves the conflict. The end of the story/novel shows how the conflict ends or in some cases, how another conflict begins that predicts the arrival of a sequel to the short story/novella/novel.

By the end of the middle part, the conflict becomes thin and the protagonist resolves the conflict. The end of the story/novel shows how the conflict ends or in some cases, how another conflict begins that predicts the arrival of a sequel to the short story/novella/novel.

The beginning, middle, and end of a short story/novel will be discussed in detail on this future in the future.