Characters’ similar quest – to find love!

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Book Review: This House of Clay and Water by Faiqa Mansab
Publisher: Penguin Random House India (22 May 2017)

It takes an effort to write a sentence and a whole lot of struggle to write a novel. Authors and novelists – either writing fiction or non-fiction – have to dwell in their mind to unearth the thoughts that create sustenance for their passion of writing and the food for avid readers’ hungry minds. In addition, in that process, the author creates a magnum opus that defines their creativity and provides an impetus for their writing career to grow rapidly. Faiqa Mansab, a promising author from Lahore, in her debut novel, This House of Clay and Water, has touched new heights of creative thinking by highlighting the very intricate details of our society that are hidden behind curtains or evident in plain sight.

 

This House of Clay and Water reveals the story through a number of characters. There are a number of voices narrating the story, therefore, making the reading experience enriching and distinctive. There are Nida and Sasha, two women who are lost in their respective worlds. Where Nida is the wife of a politician and seldom makes an effort to look good or feel good, Sasha, on the other hand, lives amidst brands and satisfying the opposite sex. Then there is Zoya, Sasha’s daughter who is lost between her world and that of her mother and fate leads her to a dark path from where she may not return only because she had been craving for her mother’s love. Then there is Bhanggi, a transgender living at a Dargah in Lahore who experiences a unique spiritual relationship with Nida. Because of Nida never finding true love, she finds solace around Bhanggi – an association not finding any place to blossom in this society for obvious reasons.

I personally fell in love with Faiqa Mansab showing the world her characters lived in. The simplest of facts such as the morning sky, the sunset, the tree, or the surroundings were shown with the writing concept of ‘show don’t tell’ to such an extent that I had to read and reread it multiple times to savor the written words. A few excerpts from the book below are a few examples:

“The sky hung listlessly over Lahore, looking faded as if it had been washed one too many times with cheap detergent.”

“There was the mystical, the colonial, the historical Lahore that had had countless marauding armies storm its legendary gates. Gates that lay in ruins now, like thirteen distorted maws, frozen in a mute scream, echoing mine.” 

“She walked over to the huge banyan tree, the bargadh. The tree was ancient, an increasingly rare sight in Lahore. The ground around it was broken and cracked, and the roots had broken out, like the gnarled fingers of a subterranean monster struggling to get out.”  

Many parts of the book made me feel the walls built around women in this society, by this society, are too harsh. It suffocates them. It hurts them. Nida has been living a life where she never experienced love from her mother, mother-in-law or husband. Nida has been neglected and made to feel insecure and insignificant by the people around her – akin to how Bhanggi feels – which connects them both emotionally and spiritually. However, in their relationship and how they feel, lies the reason for such emotional mishaps – our society is male-dominated and men want to exercise their hegemony over the opposite sex. On the other hand, Sasha, who always broke social norms and spent hours with other men in search of love but never saw a man blaming her for the life she chose. Faiqa’s way of explaining the lives of Nida, Sasha and Bhanggi is quite interesting as every character has a different life, varying problems and altering mindsets. Through Nida, Faiqa reveals the male-dominated society women live in Pakistan and how they are forced to abide by their husband’s orders. Through Bhanggi, Faiqa shows the Hijra community of Pakistan, especially of Lahore, and how the society terms them an outcast while the influential ones use and abuse them at their will. Through Sasha, Faiqa narrates the life of a lost soul who slowly transforms into a hijab wearing woman. Sasha remained dominant while she pleased men or when she turned into a religious woman – for in both of her persona she was in control. This was another delicate social predicament Faiqa looked upon in her story. Narrated with a combination of calmness and rage, Faiqa Mansab takes her readers on a journey where each character evolves in their own domain, eventually reaching the climax which itself sends the reader into introspection and retrospection.

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Faiqa Mansab’s novel divulges upon a tale of love and freedom!

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“This House of Clay and Water” is Faiqa Mansab’s debut novel, which was published by Publisher: Penguin Random House India (22 May 2017). According to the website of Penguin India, Faiqa Mansab completed her MFA in creative writing with a distinction and an award for the best thesis. Her novel This House of Clay and Water is the final version of her MFA thesis.

Faiqa Mansab’s official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/faiqamansabauthorofficial/

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While in conversation with Tehmina Qureshi and with the audience in attendance at her debut novel, Faiqa Mansab revealed how she saw a different Karachi now to the one she experienced almost fifteen years ago. However, where her novel revolves around the lanes, sights, and sounds of Lahore, she was pleased to be back in the city by the sea where she lived some part of her early life. She was talking to avid and curious readers at the launch of her debut novel, “This House of Clay and Water” on Saturday, August 5, 2017 at Liberty Books, Boat Basin, Clifton, Karachi.

Faiqa Mansab discussed her love with Lahore and the reason for her to incorporate this historic city in her debut novel. To an extent, she did face the writer’s block, but it did not hamper in her creative process for she always attunes herself to what she has to write. However, interestingly, as it is necessary for any writer, she did edit the book many times, in fact, multiple times. She said that every time she edited, she began from the first page. This kept her at par with her thoughts and enabled her to find any loopholes, mistakes, or errors in the manuscript. I believe this should be an inspirational message for all promising and aspiring writers and authors that there are no shortcuts in writing and editing. To develop an amazing manuscript and to produce a fictional piece, one must and should edit the manuscript as thoroughly as possible, even if means re-reading the editing all pages of the manuscript no matter how many they may be.

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When commenting on the story of her book, Faiqa said that out of the main three characters namely: Nida, Sasha and Bhanggi, she fell in love with Bhanggi. Later, when she read an excerpt of her book related to Bhanggi, it felt she personified this character, a eunuch, in her mind to such an extent that every word she read felt coming out of Bhanggi’s mouth. I personally told her while she was signing the book, that she used the concept of ‘show, don’t tell’ at its best for I felt Bhanggi was sitting in front of me sharing his thoughts. I had similar feelings when she read two other excerpts from her book

I began reading the book from the very next of the book launch. Believe me, I completed 57 pages in one sitting. The story is captivating from the first word. While each chapter discusses the life of one character, the story progression becomes so interesting that you have to know what happens next, which keeps your curiosity at its peak. In each chapter, you get to know the life and thoughts of all of Faiqa’s main characters. Nida, Shasha, and Bhanggi are on my mind these days as I am contemplating their future actions even as I was writing this blog. Moreover, I am also pleased to see Faiqa Mansab coming up with a Pakistani-centric story that deals with themes of love and friendship and focuses on the lives of two females and a eunuch in a patriarchal society. This House of Clay and Water is a must read book – it will take you on a ride in the lanes of Lahore while embarking you on a journey that transcends mindsets, class splits, genders, and cultures.

Zeenat Mahal brings to life Chandni, Haveli and the 70s brought to life

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Image Source: http://bit.ly/2kjOtdy

Haveli
(Novella)
By Zeenat Mahal
Indireads Incorporated (July 8, 2013)
ISBN: 978-1-927826-02-7
70 pp

The expression and style with which Zeenat Mahal describes the scenes and settings in her novel, ‘Haveli’, takes the reader back in the 1970s. Although those readers born in the 1980s, like me, may not truly connect themselves with the aura of the 70s, nevertheless, Zeenat expresses details with such vividness to create a strong image in the reader’s mind.

If her prowess to describe the story and her command over the concept of ‘show don’t tell’ isn’t enough to capture the reader’s attention, then her ability to bring the characters to life adds value to her narrative. Just take for instance the opening lines of her novel, “In the summer of 1971, I was still learning how to pour tea correctly from my grandmother. I was not Japanese either, nor a geisha. I simply had the misfortune of being the granddaughter of Zaitoon Begum, the widow of the last Nawab of Jalalabad.” Instead of telling the ancestral details of her family, she tells us about her grandfather, being a Nawab, and how it was important for her grandmother to do everything with elegance – even it was a task as simple as pouring tea in a cup.

Before the readers could involve themselves in the novel, the title, Haveli, brings upon a burst of imagination where the reader is compelled to think if the story is about a Haveli, or has to do something with the people living in it. However, the story is set in a Haveli – which focuses on a family – and especially a girl, Chandni, who is quite open-minded.

The story also entails the strong will of the Pakistani woman living in the 70s – those who adhered to simplicity but also expressed their emotions when needed. The novel begins with a serious tone but as the readers explore Chandni’s character, they experience delight when least expected. Zeenat Mahal’s protagonist, Chandni, is one of those girls who are lively, determined, and often finds themselves in hot water because of their straightforwardness.

Furthermore, one objective that Zeenat Mahal accomplishes through Haveli is to break the stereotypes about the 70s. Any writer could explain the beliefs prevailing among the middle and upper class of that era; however, Zeenat’s appropriately correct words used in the right context blends her views about the 70s with the story, giving readers something for introspection.

Chandni is a girl who grew up under her grandmother, Zaitoon Begum’s wing. Chandni calls her grandmother Bi Amma, a name that is appropriate to a grandmother, who has a strict nature and lives in a Haveli in the 70s. Chandni’s mother, Zainab, left this world for her eternal abode when Chandni was a child. Shah Jehan is Chandni’s father, who abandoned her years ago. Although Chandni never found the love of her parents, she does know how to love, which is for her crush – a man named Kunwar Rohail Khanzada. The one-sided love affair began for Chandni, when she was only nine years old, and Khanzada was 28. Chandni loves her despite the fact that Khanzada is married.

Living with her half-brother, Zafar, Chandni has a different personality from her family members. Chandni doesn’t like her name; perhaps it was an old-fashioned name for her. However, Zeenat Mahal chose an appropriate name keeping in mind the time the novel is set in. Instead of being called Chandni, she prefers others to call her ‘C.’ While Chandni is daydreaming about Khanzada, her aspirations of being her bride shatter when a wealthy and an arrogant person, Taimur, arrives at the Haveli. He is Ali or Baba’s son, her late mother’s friend. Moreover, Bi Amma, or The Broad, has decided to wed Chandni with Taimur. This is a decision Chandni wants to overturn at the earliest. It seems that Taimur and Chandni aren’t on the same page. Despite hating each other, Chandni also refers to him as Alpha Male, Uriah Heep, and Evil Moriarity. The animosity between the two is so deep, that Taimur calls Chandni as Medusa.

While this love-hate relationship is expanding, out of nowhere, Chandni’s father walks at the Haveli to claim Chandni. To add confusion, he wants Chandni to marry a groom of his choosing. To everyone’s surprise, she is willing to go with his father, perhaps to get Taimur out of her life. This also shows Chandni’s father’s egoistical behavior but also reveals that she wants to use her father to leave Bi Amma, Taimur, and the customs of the Haveli.

Perhaps it’s the rules being followed inside the Haveli that she despise, and not the structure itself. The suspense gradually builds as the readers become curious about Chandni’s future. The moment she fights with her half-brother, Zafar, with whom she has a good relationship, things becomes unsteady. The readers find themselves entwined in between many people, issues, and a question; what will Chandni do? What makes Haveli an interesting read is Zeenat Mahal’s ability to blend the characters with the plot and gradually move the story forward. Instead of giving importance to one character, she treats all characters equally. Where she thoroughly explains Chandni’s interest in Khanzada, she also explicates the hate that Taimur and Chandni share for each other. Moreover, Zeenat manages to place Bi Amma’s rigid nature right in between. Furthermore, Mahal’s prowess to put humor, comic timing in-between dialogues, and interweaving all characters together to form a cohesive plot, retains the reader’s attention throughout the 63-page novella.

The joint family system portrayed in Haveli is another cultural phenomenon that families in Pakistan were following during the 1970s. The readers are transported back in time because of Zeenat Mahal’s ‘show don’t tell’ technique – which is any fiction author’s greatest weapon. Zeenat describes the upper-class society of the 1970s, their lifestyle, education, clothing, and their philosophy of life that keeps the readers’ imagination moving. Writing fiction is a challenging task but Zeenat has done it with ease. From revealing the characters – their emotions, ambitions, and actions – to creating conflict and embedding a resolution among the characters at the end – each scene reverberates with Zeenat’s imagination and her command over her story.
Haveli
(Novella)
By Zeenat Mahal
Indireads Incorporated (July 8, 2013)
ISBN: 978-1-927826-02-7
70 pp